Anji Main (b. )


Title:

Medium:

Size:

Status:


Series:



Price List Enquiry


Share

    Mail
  • Facebook
  • Google plus
  • Pinterest
  • Tumblr
  • Twitter


Anji Jackson-Main – Curriculum Vitae

 

Education & Training

 

2009-   2011             Master of Fine Art MFA (post graduate degree)

2005 – 2008             Anglia Ruskin University, BA Hons Fine Art, 1st Class

1990 – 93                Hilal School of Raqs Sharqi, dance performer and teacher

1970 – 72                 Sheffield College of Art, Dip AD, Fine Art

1969 – 70                Loughborough College of Art, Foundation

 

Employment & Self Employment

 

2012 – present      Director/curator for Changing Spaces, artist led project

 

2008 – 2012         Studio Practice Supervisor, (Assistant Tutor), Cambridge School

of Art (Part time)

2008                         Co-curated The Syd Barrett Exhibition, City wakes

2008 – present         Artist in Residence and Video Artist for Dance Offensive,

2006 –  present         Hills Rd Adult Education, Dance Tutor (evening classes)

2007 –  present         Cambridge University Contemporary Dance Workshops, Dance

Tutor

Choreographer for dance pieces in ADC shows, Elemental (2007)

Perspectives (2008), Beauty (2009)

1985 –  present         Self-employed dance teacher, choreographer and performer

1985 – 97                 Cambridge Woman’s Resources Centre Dance Tutor

1974 –  present         Self-employed artist/painter

 

Exhibitions

2014                         Fenens Open, Hull, group show

2013                         Painting Project group show co-cuated with Dr David Ryan

2011                        “Not now whenever” group show in Redchurch St London

2009                         New Hall College, Cambridge

2009                         The Shop, Jesus College,  (Forthcoming 2 month residency)

2008                         Open Space/ Open Studio, St Barnabas Press, Cambridge (Solo)

2008                         Cambridge University Astronomy Department, (group)

1985                         Cambridge Library (joint)

1984                         Open Home Studio (joint)

 

Collections

USA collector from Yale University

Anglia Ruskin University

Cambridge Campus, 3 paintings bought by the Vice Chancellor for his office.

1 painting for the University Boardroom.

Chelmsford Campus  1 painting for newly built Health Dept.

Private collections. National and International collections

 

Awards

2008                         Anglia Ruskin University, Scholarship towards MFA

(commencing 2009)


  • Palimpsest

    Palimpsest Oil on Canvas 36 x 48 For Sale “My work explores the dynamic possibilities that arise from the use of the body in making marks on canvas. I have a background in dance, and I started by making graphic notes of my observations watching other dancers, particularly breakdancers, as well as experimenting with my own movements as I applied paint to canvas.

    It was not my intention to represent movement, so much as to attempt to penetrate the spaces between frames, so to speak, in movement. What happens in the transition between one gesture and the next? What, indeed, is movement? How do we get from here to there?

    In a painting, all the gestures that make up the brush and body strokes on the canvas exist at once, simultaneously. This is expressed in a multi-layering of image and pigment. My paintings are made very carefully in this fashion, built up layer by layer, and then sometimes reduced and built up again. The result can often be very complex, it draws the observer into a multidimensional field of action, maybe in a similar fashion to the way that the dancer draws the eye of the spectator in performance. I think of my paintings as performances that somehow stand outside time, where all the temporal elements exist simultaneously, leaving the eye free to explore their dimensions at will, in any order that presents itself, subjectively, to the viewer.”

  • Palimpsest II

    Palimpsest II Oil on Canvas 36 x 48 For Sale “My work explores the dynamic possibilities that arise from the use of the body in making marks on canvas. I have a background in dance, and I started by making graphic notes of my observations watching other dancers, particularly breakdancers, as well as experimenting with my own movements as I applied paint to canvas.

    It was not my intention to represent movement, so much as to attempt to penetrate the spaces between frames, so to speak, in movement. What happens in the transition between one gesture and the next? What, indeed, is movement? How do we get from here to there?

    In a painting, all the gestures that make up the brush and body strokes on the canvas exist at once, simultaneously. This is expressed in a multi-layering of image and pigment. My paintings are made very carefully in this fashion, built up layer by layer, and then sometimes reduced and built up again. The result can often be very complex, it draws the observer into a multidimensional field of action, maybe in a similar fashion to the way that the dancer draws the eye of the spectator in performance. I think of my paintings as performances that somehow stand outside time, where all the temporal elements exist simultaneously, leaving the eye free to explore their dimensions at will, in any order that presents itself, subjectively, to the viewer.”

  • Palimpsest III

    Palimpsest III Oil on Canvas 36 x 48 For Sale “My work explores the dynamic possibilities that arise from the use of the body in making marks on canvas. I have a background in dance, and I started by making graphic notes of my observations watching other dancers, particularly breakdancers, as well as experimenting with my own movements as I applied paint to canvas.

    It was not my intention to represent movement, so much as to attempt to penetrate the spaces between frames, so to speak, in movement. What happens in the transition between one gesture and the next? What, indeed, is movement? How do we get from here to there?

    In a painting, all the gestures that make up the brush and body strokes on the canvas exist at once, simultaneously. This is expressed in a multi-layering of image and pigment. My paintings are made very carefully in this fashion, built up layer by layer, and then sometimes reduced and built up again. The result can often be very complex, it draws the observer into a multidimensional field of action, maybe in a similar fashion to the way that the dancer draws the eye of the spectator in performance. I think of my paintings as performances that somehow stand outside time, where all the temporal elements exist simultaneously, leaving the eye free to explore their dimensions at will, in any order that presents itself, subjectively, to the viewer.”

  • Boy

    Boy Oil on Canvas For Sale “My work explores the dynamic possibilities that arise from the use of the body in making marks on canvas. I have a background in dance, and I started by making graphic notes of my observations watching other dancers, particularly breakdancers, as well as experimenting with my own movements as I applied paint to canvas.

    It was not my intention to represent movement, so much as to attempt to penetrate the spaces between frames, so to speak, in movement. What happens in the transition between one gesture and the next? What, indeed, is movement? How do we get from here to there?

    In a painting, all the gestures that make up the brush and body strokes on the canvas exist at once, simultaneously. This is expressed in a multi-layering of image and pigment. My paintings are made very carefully in this fashion, built up layer by layer, and then sometimes reduced and built up again. The result can often be very complex, it draws the observer into a multidimensional field of action, maybe in a similar fashion to the way that the dancer draws the eye of the spectator in performance. I think of my paintings as performances that somehow stand outside time, where all the temporal elements exist simultaneously, leaving the eye free to explore their dimensions at will, in any order that presents itself, subjectively, to the viewer.”